Two annoying makes

I admit it. I was having a good run. Pretty much most of what I’ve made this year has ended up being wardrobe favourites. At this point I was destined to make something I didn’t like.

Enter:

1. Merchant and Mills dress shirt. Now the pattern is lovely (if a bit on the large side), but I managed to buy the stiffest poly linen fabric (I swear you could stand the dress up on it own) on which no amount of steam can tackle creases. And the way it “falls” is giving me a hump back thanks to the way the fabric is gathered at the yoke in the back. Again, the pattern is great – with a soft cotton fabric I’m sure it would look lovely.

I also went a bit crazy with the dipped hem. It could have worked in theory, but the dye didn’t mix well, leaving red pigments stains. Also, it’s not very even, which annoys me.

Dress Shirt

DSC01569

Screen Shot 2014-07-12 at 16.49.35

I did add a lovely little trim on the sleeve that I bought at Walthamstow market for something silly like 50p a metre, which I’m thinking about transferring to another garment. Or do you have any ideas on how I should save this garment from obscurity in my closet?

2. Megan Nielsen’s Tania Culottes. Again, I really like the pattern, I just managed to choose the most see-through fabric I could find. I could have lined it, had I not noticed quite how see through they were right after have having finished the waistband. Also, I think I lengthened them too much. Note: You can’t fully appreciate how see-through they are by looking at the photo’s below (yes, that’s on purpose..), but believe me, it’s not good.

DSC01577

Tania Culottes 1

Any emergency solution to the see-through issue? Do you reckon it’s worth undoing the waistband and adding some kind of emergency lining?

My overall learning’s having done these two projects are:

  • Touch the fabric – figure out if it’s going to drape well for the garment you are making.
  • Poly linen fabrics – mental note that these take wrinkles to a whole other level.
  • Dyeing – mix the dye well. If doing a dipped hem, make sure you have a good set-up with a bucket or container wide enough for the garment.
  • Check how see-through a fabric is before making shorts in any kind of flimsy material. No one wants to see your knickers. If they do, you have a whole other problem on your hands…
Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Two annoying makes

  1. Would the dress hang better at the back if you put some pleats in instead of the gathers? Maybe topstitch them for an inch or so? And the culottes are gorgeous. With a little emergency lining and a couple of inches off the hem, I’m sure you’d love them.

  2. So frustrating when you have spent so much time on your hand-made garments and you end up with issues! You will have to put these down to expeirence… I reckon you could add a lining to your culottes if you think they are worth it ; ) The fabric is very pretty despite being see-through.

  3. Okay, my two cents…with the dress, redye, mix up a batch lighter/sheerer than the first and add a third level in between the two by dipping in more of the dress with that larger bucket that you are going to find. The Tanias should definitely be saved, those are gorgeous!! So, take off the waist band and line with a similar melon shade fabric. If a similar shade you could hem it much shorter for an effect, the lined part will be slightly darker and then you would have a lighter layer below.

  4. Ah yes, the inevitable end of the run. :) Though I have to say, you ended your run with some pretty fabulous garments! I love the dress…but maybe hack it off at the hips into a shirt? Then the wrinkles won’t matter as much? And the culottes are fun too. I love that fabric. I’d either line it or go with the boyshorts underneath!

    xx
    C

    • The chopping off the dress is actually a great idea. I think i’ll give that one a go – saves me any more fiddly dip dying! Might even chop off the sleeves… Hmm.. endless options when sewing :) Thanks love!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s